Test Your Knowledge: “Brain Drain”

Mehr und mehr englische Begriffe fließen in unsere deutsche Sprache ein und werden nicht immer korrekt benutzt. Heute schauen wir uns Wörter rund um „brain“ an. So bekommen Sie größere Sicherheit im Wortschatz, verfeinern Ihre Recherchekompetenz und gewinnen Hintergrundwissen für den nächsten Small oder Big Talk.

Doch bevor wir tiefer in die Materie eintauchen, lockern Sie Ihre Sprachmuskulatur mit einer kleinen Aufwärmübung.

Exercise: Gehirnjogging

Write down the translation or describe in English what is meant by the word. And if you don’t know what it means, use dictionaries or the internet to find out!

brain drain
::::::_
::::::_
::::::_
braindead
::::::_
brain freeze
::::::_
::::::_
::::::_
brainchild
::::::_
brainiac
::::::_
brainyoo
::::::_
::::::_
::::::_
brainstorming
::::::_
::::::_
brainpan
::::::_
brainstorm
::::::_
brain gym
::::::_
::::::_
::::::_
brainpool
::::::_
::::::_
::::::_

Answer key

Schreibweisen der Wörter

This collection of compound nouns using “brain” is a good example of how to understand and recognise (BE)/recognize (AE) these words in English, especially when it comes to headlines or brand names.

  • Join them without any spacing as in “brainchild”?
  • Write them separately as two words such as “brain drain”?
  • Or hyphenate them as in the invented word “brain-teaser”? Which you decide to use can initially appear to be quite random. But if we look closer the choice quite often corresponds with an internal company directive on how to use compounds describing their products.

You will find more information about this subject at the end of this issue under “If in doubt cut it out”.

Exercise: Geschützter Bindestrich

BTW, talking about hyphens: Do you know what a “geschützter Bindestrich”, one which must not be separated at the end of a line, is called in English?

Answer key

Der deutsche Braindrain

Now let us come back to the headline: Brain drain, which in German means, as we have seen in the exercise above, the emigration of individuals with technical skills or knowledge from organisations (BE)/organizations (AE), industries or geographical regions; what does it mean for Germany?

It is well known that scientists working in the field of research and development tend to leave Germany as they can find better work conditions and higher salaries in other countries, e.g. the United States.

According to the EFI (Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation) more scientists left Germany (about 4,000) than came in from other countries in the years between 1996 and 2011. This leads us to the question whether “brain as such” is leaving Germany.

The iw dienst Nr. 17-2014 contrasts figures: in 2010 about 24,000 German medical doctors worked abroad. But at least 31,000 medical doctors from abroad worked in Germany. The author of the iwd argues that, looking at it this way, Germany is even better off for scientists.

But is immigration of knowledge good enough to compensate for the emigration of highly qualified, well-trained specialists from German universities?


Quote


To know, is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge.

Sokrates 

Do you think the iwd’s article that the immigration of knowledge correlates to an assumed German braindrain is acceptable in times of globalisation? Is it simply the number of actual scientists in a country that makes it progressive? Or does the way a country supports its own scientists have to be taken into consideration too?

This is a good subject for a serious talk of course; it is definitely not suitable for small talk.

Total 0 Votes
0

Tell us how can we improve this post?

+ = Verify Human or Spambot ?